Recently I’ve noticed that my programming skill set has sort of calcified in a very systems/operations orientation. By that I mean that I’m still very comfortable with scripting, whether it be python, ruby, or bash, mostly in order to automate things. Or at least that’s where I’ve perceived myself and to “fix” the issue, I had been trying to make myself learn (more)Go or Android(mostly Kotlin) programming and it’s just not going smoothly. I have no motivation to sit down and make myself abstractly learn anything. Then I had an epiphany that despite all the “learn something” tech books on my shelf, I’ve never actually gone through them step by step and learned from them other than maybe as language reference for quick look up. Instead when I’ve always learned by doing and looking under the covers of existing software to see how it works or if I have used any premade tutorials, it’s mostly to look at the examples. It’s how I learned VB6 in middle school and how I learned C while writing an (unimpressive) operating system in high school. And this isn’t a new thing, I’ve been trying to make myself “book learn” for years and it’s never quite stuck, at least for technical topics. A few years ago when I needed to move from 90’s era scrolling text and general web annoyance Javascript to modern Javascript web application programming, I just sat down and did it. I don’t know why I’m alway so obsessed with trying to do this the “right way” even though it’s never worked. So if I want to freshen up my application development skills I just need to read and write some code. Of course that still comes back to a matter of motivation and whether I can come up with a project I care enough about to actually do. I think I have a couple of candidates, one I think I mentioned in a previous post which is an Android version of Nextcloud cookbook app. I wanted to do it last weekend, but instead of sitting down to create that app, I sat down with a book on Android programming and quickly got tired of it. So this weekend I’m going to have another go at it and just start working on it and figure out roadblocks when I come to it. Turns out that it’s the only way I know how to learn.